Stanley Allen Meyer Water Fuel Cell Ravi Dave Lawton WFC HHO

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Friday, December 5, 2008

Stanley Meyer: Additional Fact and Historical Reference material about converting pure water to fuel

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Encyclopedia > Water fuel cell

Perpetual motion machine:
Water fuel cell
Disciplines: Physics and engineering
Core Tenets: The device is designed to produce hydrogen and oxygen, from water using electricity, by a method other than water electrolysis.
Year Proposed: 1989

Original Proponents: This is a discussion of a present category of science. ...

Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ...

Hoffman voltameter used to electrolyze water. ...

Stanley Meyer

Current Proponents:

unknown

Theory violation:

First law of thermodynamics The first law of thermodynamics, a generalized expression of the law of the conservation of energy, states: // Description Essentially, the First Law of Thermodynamics declares that energy is conserved for a closed system, with heat and work being the forms of energy transfer. ...

Water fuel cell is reportedly a perpetual motion machine. Such machines violate the known laws of physics. Claims of the development of such devices are considered pseudoscience by most scientists.

The water fuel cell, named by American Stanley Meyer, is a device designed to convert water into its component elements, hydrogen and oxygen (2H2O → 2H2 + O2).[citation needed] The Water Fuel Cell is designed to utilize less energy to break molecular bonds than the quantity capable of being recovered by combustion of the product hydrogen and oxygen gases; the validity of the design is controversial. The water fuel cell is claimed to be able to produce several times more energy than it consumes; the source of this additional energy has not been scientifically identified therefore the theory is treated with skepticism. In practice, an engine would be connected to the output of a water fuel cell and through the combustion process convert the hydrogen back into water (2H2 + O2 → 2H2O), which can then be vented to the fuel tank (containing water) [1]; such a practice conforms to the parameters of perpetual motion, hence conclusive scientific investigation would either verify violation of thermodynamic law or identify the source of claimed additional energy. At least one car prototype, reportedly powered by a water fuel cell, has been assembled.[2] This article or section should include material from Parallel Path See also Perpetuum mobile as a musical term Perpetual motion machines (the Latin term perpetuum mobile is not uncommon) are a class of hypothetical machines which would produce useful energy in a way science cannot explain (yet). ...

A physical law or a law of nature is a scientific generalization based on empirical observations. ...

Phrenology is regarded today as a classic example of pseudoscience. ...

This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ...

General Name, Symbol, Number hydrogen, H, 1 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 1, 1, s Appearance colorless Atomic mass 1. ...

General Name, Symbol, Number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series nonmetals, chalcogens Group, Period, Block 16, 2, p Appearance colorless (gas) very pale blue (liquid) Standard atomic weight 15. ...

Skepticism (Commonwealth spelling: Scepticism) can mean: Philosophical skepticism - a philosophical position in which people choose to critically examine whether the knowledge and perceptions that they have are actually true, and whether or not one can ever be said to have absolutely true knowledge; or Scientific skepticism - a scientific, or practical...

A combustion reaction taking place in a igniting match Combustion or burning is a complex sequence of exothermic chemical reactions between a fuel and an oxidant accompanied by the production of heat or both heat and light in the form of either a glow or flames. ...

This article or section should include material from Parallel Path See also Perpetuum mobile as a musical term Perpetual motion machines (the Latin term perpetuum mobile is not uncommon) are a class of hypothetical machines which would produce useful energy in a way science cannot explain (yet). ...


Meyer's claims about the Water Fuel Cell and the car that it powered were found to be fraudulent by an Ohio court in 1996.[1] Similar devices have been promoted by others; see Water-fuelled car. A water-fuelled car is a hypothetical motor car that uses ordinary water as its fuel. ...


Stanley Meyer was granted patents in the United States and abroad starting in 1989. The verifiability, and scientific basis, of the patents are controversial. For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Construction








The water fuel cell, as described in Meyer's patents.

The water fuel cell, as described in Meyer's patents.

The fuel cell consists of stainless steel plates arranged as a capacitor, with pure water acting as the dielectric. A rising staircase of direct current pulses is sent through the plates at roughly 42 kHz, which is claimed to play a role in the water molecules breaking apart with less directly applied energy than is required by standard electrolysis. The mechanism of this reaction is undocumented. Image File history File links From Stanley Meyers water fuel cell patent, which he claimed produced more energy than it consumed. ...

Image File history File links From Stanley Meyers water fuel cell patent, which he claimed produced more energy than it consumed. ...

The 630 foot high, stainless-clad (type 304L) Gateway Arch defines St. ...

See Capacitor (component) for a discussion of specific types. ...

A dielectric, or electrical insulator, is a substance that is highly resistant to electric current. ...

Direct current (DC or continuous current) is the continuous flow of electricity through a conductor such as a wire from high to low potential. ...

A kilohertz (kHz) is a unit of frequency equal to 1,000 hertz (1,000 cycles per second). ...


Meyer presented his fuel cell device to Professor Michael Laughton, Dean of Engineering at Queen Mary College, London, Admiral Sir Anthony Griffin, a former controller of the British Navy, and Dr. Keith Hindley, a UK research chemist.[3] According to the witnesses, the Meyer cell remained remarkably cold, even after hours of gas production as his system appeared to operate on much smaller current than conventional electrolysis would require. The witnesses also stated: Michael Laughton Professor Michael Laughton is Emeritus Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Queen Mary College, University of London, and currently Visiting Professor at the Department of Environmental Science and Technology in Imperial College. ...

In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ...

Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ...

Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL) (until 2000 Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London and still called that in its charter [1] and occasionally still abbreviated to QMW) is the fourth largest College of the University of London. ...

For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ...

The Royal Navy is the navy of the United Kingdom. ...

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...

For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ...

Hoffman voltameter used to electrolyze water. ...

After hours of discussion between ourselves, we concluded that Stan Meyer did appear to have discovered an entirely new method for splitting water which showed few of the characteristics of classical electrolysis. Confirmation that his devices actually do work come from his collection of granted US patents on various parts of the WFC system. Since they were granted under Section 101 by the US Patent Office, the hardware involved in the patents has been examined experimentally by US Patent Office experts and their seconded experts and all the claims have been established.[3]

Its name not withstanding, the water fuel cell is not a true fuel cell. It would be an electrolytic cell, as it is claimed to produce hydrogen from water and not the opposite. [4] A fuel cell is an electrochemical device similar to a battery, but differing from the latter in that it is designed for continuous replenishment of the reactants consumed; i. ...


Meyer's water-fueled car


The circuit used to drive the water fuel cell, as described in Meyer's patents.

The circuit used to drive the water fuel cell, as described in Meyer's patents.

It Runs on Water is a video with Stanley Meyer demonstrating the water fuel cell in a car.[5] Meyer claimed that he could run a 1.6 liter Volkswagen dune buggy on water instead of gasoline.[1] He replaced the spark plugs with "injectors" to spray a fine mist into the engine cylinders, which he claimed were electrified at a resonant frequency. The fuel cell would split water into hydrogen and oxygen gas, which would be combusted back into water vapor in a conventional internal combustion engine to produce net energy.[1] Meyer demonstrated his vehicle for his city's local station Action 6 News and estimated that only 83 liters (22 US gallons) of water was required to travel from Los Angeles to New York. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (913x552, 98 KB) From Stanley Meyers water fuel cell patent, which he claimed produced more energy than it consumed. ...

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (913x552, 98 KB) From Stanley Meyers water fuel cell patent, which he claimed produced more energy than it consumed. ...

The Water Fuel Cell is an electrolysis device which is claimed to break water into hydrogen and oxygen gas using less energy than the energy present in the bond itself. ...

Volkswagen AG (ISIN: DE0007664005), or VW, is an automobile manufacturer based in Wolfsburg, Germany. ...

Dune buggy George W. Bush in a Dune buggy A dune buggy is a recreational vehicle with small wheels, and thin tires, designed for use on water dunes or beaches. ...

This article or section should include material from Spark gap A spark plug is an electrical device that fits into the cylinder head of some internal combustion engines and ignites compressed aerosol gasoline by means of an electric spark. ...

In an electrical circuit, resonance occurs at a particular frequency when the inductive reactance and the capacitive reactance are of equal magnitude, causing electrical energy to oscillate between the magnetic field of the inductor and the electric field of the capacitor. ...

The internal combustion engine is an engine in which the combustion of fuel and an oxidizer (typically air) occurs in a confined space called a combustion chamber. ...


Lawsuit

In 1996, inventor Stanley Meyer was sued by investors to whom he had sold dealerships, offering the right to do business in Water Fuel Cell technology. According to The Times, Meyer claimed in court that his invention "opened the way for a car which would 'run on water', powered simply by a car battery."[1] The car would even run perpetually without fuel since the energy needed to continue the "fracturing" was low enough for the engine's dynamo to recharge the car's battery.[1] His car was due to be examined by the expert witness Michael Laughton, Professor of Electrical Engineering at Queen Mary, University of London and Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering. However, Meyer made what Professor Laughton considered a "lame excuse" on the days of examination and did not allow the test to proceed.[1] The Water Fuel Cell, on the other hand, was examined by three expert witnesses in court who found that there "was nothing revolutionary about the cell at all and that it was simply using conventional electrolysis".[1] The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1788. ...

Michael Laughton Professor Michael Laughton is Emeritus Professor of Electrical Engineering at the Queen Mary College, University of London, and currently Visiting Professor at the Department of Environmental Science and Technology in Imperial College. ...

Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ...

Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL) (until 2000 Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London and still called that in its charter [1] and occasionally still abbreviated to QMW) is the fourth largest College of the University of London. ...

It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...

The Royal Academy of Engineering is a British learned society concerned with engineering. ...


On the basis of the evidence the court found Meyer guilty of "gross and egregious fraud" and ordered to repay the investors their $25,000.[1]


Death

Stanley Meyer died at the age of 57 after eating at a restaurant on 21 March 1998.[citation needed] An autopsy report by Franklin County coroner William R. Adrion showed the cause of death to be a cerebral aneurysm. Conspiracy theories persist, however, that he was poisoned, and that oil companies and the United States government were involved in his death.[6] is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...

Franklin County is a county located in the state of Ohio. ...

A coroner is either the presiding officer of a special court, a medical officer, or an officer of law responsible for investigating deaths, particularly those happening under unusual circumstances. ...

A cerebral or brain aneurysm is a cerebrovascular disorder in which weakness in the wall of a cerebral artery or vein causes a localized dilation or ballooning of the blood vessel. ...

A conspiracy theory is a theory that defies common historical or current understanding of events, under the claim that those events are the result of manipulations by two or more individuals or various secretive powers or conspiracies. ...


Patents

Stanley Meyer

See also

A fuel cell is an electrochemical device similar to a battery, but differing from the latter in that it is designed for continuous replenishment of the reactants consumed; i. ...

This article is about the chemical process. ...

Phrenology is regarded today as a classic example of pseudoscience. ...

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Doctor Who novel, see Cold Fusion (Doctor Who). ...

The gasoline pill or gasoline powder is one of several fictitious or fraudulent concoctions that claim to turn water into gasoline, which can be used to run an automobile. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Edwards, Tony. "End of road for car that ran on Water", The Sunday Times, Times Newspapers Limited, 1996-12-01, p. Features 12. Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  2. ^ YouTube video purportedly demonstrating a water fuel cell.[this source's reliability may need verification]
  3. ^ a b Ogden, Frank. "Free energy for ever?" Wireless World, January 1991, p.16.
  4. ^ The "The Columbia Encyclopedia", Columbia University Press 2004 defines fuel cell as an "Electric cell in which the chemical energy from the oxidation of a gas fuel is converted directly to electrical energy in a continuous process"; and electrolysis as "Passage of an electric current through a conducting solution or molten salt that is decomposed in the process.".
  5. ^ Coverage of Stan Meyer's invention on "Action 6 News"
  6. ^ Water Powered Car report on Meyer's death states (as of January 2007), "He was a shame to hear that he was poisoned .... He died in the parking lot of a restaurant in his home town of Grove City, Ohio. Sharks came a week later and stole the dune buggy and all of his experimental equipment, according to his brother, Steve. Stan said while he was alive, that he was threatened many times and would not sell out to Arab Oil Corp."

The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ...

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...

May 16 is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Wireless World was the preeminent British magazine for radio and electronics enthusiasts. ...

This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ...

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